modified on 27 July 2013 at 11:11 ••• 41,762 views

HomePartition

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Creating a seperate /home partition will help you preserve your private data at all times during upgrades and while installing a new Ubuntu version. Select custom/manual partitioning during installation. Then implement one of the partitioning schemes outlined in the tables below. The one you choose depends on whether you intend to use Microsoft or not.


Preperation

Read the following:

Then watch the following youtube video:

References

Tables of possible partitioning schemes

Option A - Ubuntu only

Three primary partitions on one disk with the /home folder mounted on the third partition.

Mount Point Partition Size Common Name Format Type Description
/ sda1/hda1 20 GB system/root ext4/ext3 This is your Ubuntu system partition. Remember to select the system partition to be bootable.
swap sda2/hda2 2 x installed RAM swap swap This is where Linux puts data as the computers random access memory (RAM) fills up. This should be roughly twice the size of your RAM, or a little more.
/home sda3/hda3 All the rest home ext4/ext3 Putting /home on a separate partition makes for easy backup. And if you install again, your settings are saved. This is optional, if you don't make it a separate partition it will go in the root. It can be as large as you like.
Option B - Ubuntu and Microsoft in dual-boot mode

Four primary partitions on one disk with Microsoft Windows on the first partition and with the /home folder mounted on the fourth partition.

Mount Point Partition Size Common Name Format Type Description
c:\ sda1/hda1 50% of disk size C:\ drive ntfs This is your Microsoft Windows partition. Remember to select this partition to be bootable.
/ sda2/hda2 20 GB system/root ext4/ext3 This is your Ubuntu system partition.
swap sda3/hda3 2 x installed RAM swap swap This is where Linux puts data as the computers random access memory (RAM) fills up. This should be roughly twice the size of your RAM, or a little more.
/home sda4/hda4 All the rest home ext4/ext3 Putting /home on a separate partition makes for easy backup. And if you install again, your settings are saved. This is optional, if you don't make it a separate partition it will go in the root. It can be as large as you like.

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